Communism

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This article deals with communism as it relates to NationStates. For more general information, please see the Wikipedia article on the subject.

Communism is an ideological system based largely upon the writings of Karl Marx. Communism contains numerous theoretical and cultural traditions. The one constant among people who consider themselves Communists is a belief in complete collective ownership of the means of production. However, Communists differ widely on the means to be used in obtaining this goal, the nature political organization should take in a Communist society, and over the relationship between religion and political economy. Communism can be divided into several main branches: Stalinism, Maoism, Trotskyism, and Humanistic Communism.

The major alliance which consists of Communist and pro-Communist states is the Coalition of Anti-Capitalist Economies. Individual nations noted for their practice of Communism are Constantinopolis, Hogsweat, and Eurusea.

In addition to nations governed by Communist policies, a number of other nations have Communist movements in one form or another. Communists in non-Communist nations can take the form of underground movements, legal parliamentary parties, philosophical study groups, armed insurgency groups, or terrorist organizations.

Early communism

The notion of communism has a long history in the thought of the West and in the traditions of peoples are around the world. Many of the theories of classical philosophy are often considered to be communistic, especially some of the political ideals of Platonism, which involve the ownership of all property by the polity. Early Christian ideals are also often seen as communistic and many historians of Christianity argue that the members of the early Church lived a communal life. A reflection of such a history might be found today in the communal living of convents and monastaries.

There is also much anthropological evidence to suggest that hunter-gather societies and some early agrarian societies featured communal ownership of property. This is referred to by Marxists as primitive communism. While this social system did not last long past the evolution of sedentary towns and cities in most places, it can still be found today in the common lands owned by many rural villages in many parts of the world.

Examples of Communist nations

Nations which claim to have attained pure communism

Pure communism, which may also be described as anarchy, implies a full withering away of the State. Hence, the following nations no longer have what may be deemed a government in the conventional sense.

Democracies led by a Communist Party

Technically speaking, these are not communist nations but State socialist ones. In the following nations, a political party advocating communism as its ultimate goal has achieved and maintained power through democratic means.

Dictatorships led by a Communist Party

Technically speaking, these are not communist nations either but State socialist ones. In the following nations, a political party advocating communism as its ultimate goal is in power and has outlawed other political parties and/or elections.