International Fair Trade Agreement

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The IFTA

The International Fair Trade Agreement
Headquarters Glasburgh, Celdonia
Members: 76
Type: Economic Treaty
Forum: The Conference of the IFTA

The International Fair Trade Agreement is a treaty that forms a closed trading bloc of nations that have chosen to trade only with other members of the bloc that protect workers' rights. The IFTA was created by a CACE initiative and was quickly ratified by a large number of other nations. It is currently one of the largest formal trading blocs in the world, and the only to require legal commitments from signatories to maintain a living wage, a safe workplace and a economy which respects the ideas of worker's rights within their nations. Other than meeting the standards set out in the treaty, there is no restriction on membership - any nation may sign the agreement and join the IFTA trading bloc, except (by general agreement) puppets.

Economic Growth within IFTA

Most nations joining the International Fair Trade Agreement have experienced significant economic development and growth over time without the costs to workers' rights typically listed as necessary for growth. According to data gathered by the Erikson Archetypal Tendency and Metamorphasis Examination firm in Galdago, nearly half of all IFTA member states are ranked in the top 20% of the fastest growing economies in the NationStates Universe. The chart below is based on their data and it indicates the percentage of IFTA membership in each percentile block of worldwide rankings for fastest economic growth.

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Additionally, long-term data gathered by the Not Bored! Economists and Accountants Collective in Free Soviets has shown a consistent trend of economic growth and development. This trend is particularly striking when compared to an assumed baseline reading of anticapitalist nations (obtained by compiling data from two of the largest anticapitalist regions, the Anticapitalist Alliance and The Proletariat Coalition). While not every nation that is a member of IFTA counts itself as anticapitalist, the majority do, so the comparison is meaningful. The charts reproduced below are from the most recent Not Bored! report on IFTA economic development.

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IFTA signatories

These nations are signatories of the International Fair Trade Agreement.


Exemptions

Under special circumstances, IFTA members are permitted to trade with non-signatories. Such exemptions must be approved by a majority of those members casting a vote. Sometimes this trade is the first step to joining the trade bloc, as in the case of the exemption granted to SeOCC to trade with Milesia. In other cases it is granted for political reasons, for instance the exemption allowing certain signatories to trade with Ecopoeia.

See Also